Tag Archives: Awareness

Reflection for today…Time is of The Essence -Buddha

27 Feb

“The trouble is,

you think you have time.”

-Buddha

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Buddha’s reflection on time is that it is taken for granted.

Time is of the essence because death is approaching {memento mori}.

Being mindful gives us awareness of how we use our time. Hopefully our time is being used living our potential and awakening spiritually and otherwise.

The key is to live in the present moment {the now} and do your very best.

*

I wonder about Buddhist conceptions of time.

I found an intriguing excerpt on Buddhist notions of time from www.tricycle.com 

Daniel Goleman: “What is the Buddhist understanding of Time? How can we relate our sense of the process of time to our experience of the present moment?

His Holiness the Dalai Lama: In Buddhism, the concept of linear time, of time as a kind of container, is not accepted. Time itself, I think, is something quite weak. It depends on some physical basis, some specific thing. Apart from that thing it is difficult to pinpoint—to see time. Time is understood or conceived only in relation to a phenomenon or a process.

DG: Yet the passage of time seems very concrete—the past, the present, aging. The process of time seems very real.

HH: This business of time is a difficult subject. There are several different explanations and theories about time; there is no one explanation in Buddhism. I feel there is a difference between time and the phenomena on which time is projected. Time can be spoken of only in relation to phenomena susceptible to change, which because they are susceptible to change are transitory and impermanent. “Impermanent” means there is a process. If there is no process of change, then one cannot conceive of time in the first place.

The question is whether it is possible to imagine an independent time which is not related to any particulars, any object that goes through change. In relation to such an object, we can talk about the past of that thing, its present state, and its future; but without relation to such particulars, it is very difficult to conceive of an instant of time totally independent of a particular basis.”

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This video clip is from The Tudors.

King Henry the eighth reflects on loss.

He asks his beloved friend Charles Brandon

What loss is to man most irrecoverable?

Charles answers virtue and then honour.

Henry says that by his actions man can redeem his virtue.

He may  also find the means to recover his honour as he recovers fortune that has been lost.

Henry answers…

Of all losses time is the most irrecuperable for it can never be redeemed.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O0RME0FD1_k

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I highly recommend watching The Tudors if you haven’t seen it yet…

Jonathan Rhys Meyers’ performance as Henry VIII is unforgettable to say the least.

Long live the king!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qTiL8pgNqhs

Have a surrealist day 😉

Peace & Namaste…

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Reflection for today…Compassion Is The Key To Enlightenment -Buddha

15 Dec

“For those of you who want to attain enlightenment,

do not study many teachings.

Only study one.

What is it?

It is great compassion.

Whoever has great compassion has all Buddha’s qualities in his hand.”

-Buddha

Photo Courtesy of: http://www.tibetanecology.org/Tibetan-Tent_files/tibetan_contemporary_art_mantras.html
Compassion Mantra: Om Ma Ni Pad Me Hum
Art by: Artist: Tsultrim Gyatso
“All the teachings of Buddha are contained within the six letters, also it is the embodiment of the compassion Buddha Avalokiteshvara. Tibetans believe that praying or chanting the mantra will increase your compassion and make closer your connection to the Buddha Avalokiteshvara eventually achieving Buddhahood.”

Photo Courtesy of: http://www.wiseattention.org/blog/2012/04/01/palden-gyatso/
This photo accompanies a sobering and inspiring articled entitled,
‘Compassion for My Torturer’: A Meeting With Palden Gyatso.”
Written by: Vishvapani on http://www.wiseattention.org/
“Tibetan Buddhist monk, Palden Gyatso, spent 33 years imprisoned by the Chinese and drew deep on his Buddhist practice to survive his brutal treatment. He escaped to the West to tell his story and I met him in London to discuss his experiences his searing memoir, Fire Under the Snow.”

Angelina Jolie Photographed by: PER-ANDERS PETTERSSON
The caption on his website:
Darfur Refugees
“Angelina Jolie, the Oscar winning actress and UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador, holds a mentally disturbed boy, as he is tied with a rope in a camp in Oure Cassoni, Chad, 2007.
Angelina Jolie met the 7 year-old boy while spending two days visiting Oure Cassoni, a refugee camp close to the Sudan border.
Almost 27,000 refugees lives there and it was opened in 2004.”
“I also spent time with SOS Children’s villages staff, and we visited a 7-year-old boy that was held with a rope to a pole by his family.
This to keep him from wandering away, they said.
According to SOS, the boy saw his village bombed when he was 3- years old.
He hid alone in the bush for 2 days before his family found him and they all fled across the border.
SOS Children’s villages launched an emergency relief program for refugees from Darfur in 2006.
They focus on providing psychosocial care for traumatized children and their parents.
They presently care for about 230 children and adults.
Many have been living in the camp since 2004.
Many children experience symptoms such as nightmares, bedwetting and behavioral problems.
These children are often in a state of anxiety and they often have hallucinations. The children attend group therapy sessions where they play, sing and paint.
They work closely together with UNHCR and International Rescue Committee in the camp.”

Angelina Jolie: Humanitarian, Social Activist & Beautiful Soul

Audrey Hepburn: Humanitarian, Social Activist & Beautiful Soul

Peace & Namaste Friends…

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Reflection for today…Choosing the way we will depart -Paulo Coelho

11 Nov

Choosing the way we will depart.

Choosing the way we will depart

by Paulo Coelho on November 7, 2012

As you probably know, we are all going to die one day.

As we become aware of that, we should surrender to life with much more joy, making things we always postpone, respecting the precious minutes that are passing by and will never come back, disclosing and discovering horizons that can be interesting or disappointing, but deserve at least a little bit of our effort.

It’s normal that we try to avoid death.

It isn’t only normal, it’s the healthiest attitude we can adopt. It is an aberration however to deny it, as the awareness of it lends us much more courage.

If I were to die today, what would I like to do that I haven’t done yet? This is my thought every morning. I learned, along the Saint James Path, that the Angel of Death is my best counsellor.

Yamamoto Tsunetomo says to his disciple: ‘All of us want to live and that is absolutely natural. However, we should learn from childhood on to choose our best way to die.

‘If we don’t do that, we end up spending our days like a dog, only in search of harbour, food and expressing a blind loyalty to his owner in return. That isn’t enough to make our lives have a meaning.’

It is no use in trying to create a world apparently safe and I can find nothing better to explain that than a little story by John O’Hara:

A man goes to the market to buy fruits, when he sees his own Death walking among the people.

Desperate, he runs back and asks his employer to exempt him that day, as he had seen his Death from close.

His boss lets him go to his village, but starts thinking that all that might have been a lie. He goes to the market and really sees his employee’s Death, sitting in a bank.

He complains: ‘But what are you doing here? My servant was surprised to see you and because of that I had to dismiss him from work!” ‘I was surprised to see him here as well,’ Death answers.

‘I have a date with him at five o’clock, at his village, and as it seems, he will escape me!’

The employer thinks of calling his worker back, but it is already late. Destiny will be fulfilled as it had been written, especially because the man was afraid of Death and decided to run away.

Copied & Pasted from Paulo Coelho’s Blog: http://paulocoelhoblog.com/2012/11/07/choosing-the-way-we-will-depart/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+PauloCoelhosBlog+%28Paulo+Coelho%27s+Blog%29

My aunt always says that even angels cry when people waste their time…

For more information on Paulo Coelho,

please visit his official website: http://www.paulocoelho.com/

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Peace & Namaste…

Gabriel Byrne Discusses The Abyss of Depression & Alcoholism…

11 Aug

Gabriel Byrne discusses depression and alcoholism in an interview on Irish television channel RTÉ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g51AcR8Et-g

It really is an excellent interview from a show is called The Meaning of Life.

To watch the full interview, please click here: http://archive.org/embed/GabrielByrne-TheMeaningOfLifeWithGayByrne

You can also click on this link Gabriel Byrne Meaning of Life Interview. Then click on the January 17, 2010 The Meaning of Life with Gay Byrne interview.

http://www.rte.ie/tv/meaningoflife/s2p1.html Gabriel Byrne The Meaning of Life

GabrielByrne-TheMeaningOfLifeWithGayByrne

{I apologize but I was unable to embed or send this video as those options were not available. If you could help me to embed this video from the internet archive, then I would be ever so grateful}.

I copied and pasted the description of the interview from the show’s web site:

“…The basis for a searching interview, in which Gabriel talks engagingly and openly about his life: his decision to enter a UK seminary at the age of eleven; his experiences of clerical sexual abuse; his reasons for giving up on any idea of priesthood and his search for another vocation, which found fulfilment in acting; his relationships with the two key women in his life, Aine O’Connor and Ellen Barkinhis on-going struggle with twin demons – alcoholism and depression – in which he knows he is far from alone in this country; and the reason he thinks so much about death.”

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Gabriel says that alcoholism and depression are seen as moral failings– as if something is wrong with the person for being “weak” or “not good enough.” These feelings of inadequacy have probably existed before. They only become exacerbated with drinking and by the judgment of others.

***Alcohol only adds fuel to the fire.***

He also notes that alcoholism and depression are often intertwined; hence the “twin demons” reference. They are so inextricably linked that I wonder how one can be divorced from the other. I don’t believe that they can- especially since alcoholism is a depressant. People drink to get out of depression. The more they drink, the more depressed they become; hence, the vicious and self-destructive cycle continues.

Gabriel says that, “Part of the disease of alcoholism is removing yourself from reality as quickly as possible.” Essentially he is describing an emotional disconnection, spiritual disconnection- numbness.  He describes binge drinking as a plague because people emotionally disconnect from themselves, from others and from life. 

I think it is vital for people to be honest about depression and addiction {in any form}. Awareness and honesty is what will give them insight. Courage will allow them to look in the mirror and take the first step on the path to healing.

Then people can start to fight their demons.

I pray that they win.

*People suffering from any addiction or illness need our compassion.

{You never know if your compassion can give them strength to battle their demons and to heal}.

*

For more information on Gabriel Byrne,

please visit…Byrneholics.

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Peace & Namaste…

Reflection for today…Choose Another Path- Portia Nelson

26 Jul

AUTOBIOGRAPHY IN FIVE SHORT CHAPTERS
poem by Portia Nelson from her book

There’s a Hole in My Sidewalk: The Romance of Self-Discovery

Chapter I

I walk down the street. There is a hole in the sidewalk.

I fall in. I am lost. I am helpless. It isn’t my fault.

It takes forever to find a way out.

Chapter II

I walk down the same street. There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.

I pretend I don’t see it. I fall in again.

I can’t believe I am in the same place.

But it isn’t my fault.

It still takes a long time to get out.

Chapter III

I walk down the same street. There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.

I see it is there. I still fall in. It’s a habit.

My eyes are open. I know where I am.

It is my fault. I get out immediately.  

Chapter IV

I walk down the same street. There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.

I walk around it.  

Chapter V

I walk down another street.