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Reflection for today…A New Language Unlocks A New World -Rumi & Penny Dreadful’s Verbis Diablo

31 Oct

Editor’s note: Happy Halloween!!!

As someone who appreciates the supernatural, horror and the macabre, Halloween is naturally my favourite holiday.

To be honest, every day is Halloween in my gothic heart.

Side note: tonight is the second moon in October {which is a rare astrological event}. It is thought to be a blue moon. How exciting for all the stargazers.

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“Speak a new language so that the world will be a new world.”

-Rumi

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Penny Dreadful‘s gothic supernatural television series explores the ancient language of the verbis diablo {the devil’s tounge}.

Penny Dreadful Vanessa Ives Verbis Diablo Blood Scorpion

In penny dreadful’s mythology, the verbis diablo is a supposedly dead language with an esoteric nature. Few know about the verbis diablo and fewer people can decipher it or use it. {Egyptologist Ferdinand Lyle is a master translator of the verbis diablo}.

It is very intriguing that the verbis diablo has biblical roots. According to Dr.Victor Frankenstein, “the verbis diablo is a corruption of angelical speech. What Adam spoke in paradise before the serpent made his memorable appearance.”

Ethan Chandler notes that according to the story, “Satan took God’s language and turned it inside out. After the fall of man,  God spoke to Adam, but Adam could no longer understand him. “Why is my language unclear to thee? Because you now longer belong to your father, the devil.” 

– Fresh Hell

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Penny Dreadful’s mythology lays out clearly defined rules for the Verbis Diablo.

“Verbis Diablo is the ancient language that holds powers in its sentences. Both daywalkers as well as nightcomers can learn to speak the language and use it for their spellcraft. According to Biblical lore, the Verbis Diablo (approximately “Words of the Devil” in Latin) was a corrupted version of the language spoke in the Garden of Eden before mankind was banished on Earth. Its use blackens the hearts of those who speak it, until the thoughts and words of the speaker will be totally manipulated by Lucifer.

https://penny-dreadful.fandom.com/wiki/Verbis_Diablo_(language)

Speaking the verbis diablo has dire consequences.

Joan Clayton warns Vanessa Ives…

Joan Clayton (to Vanessa Ives): “You must remember such incantations are dangerous and you must never speak the Devil’s language idly. Let this language not become easy in your mouth or soon it will no longer be your mouth but his. And it will tell only lies. For he is the Father of Lies. If you believe in God, better you pray with all you got in you. Only if all else fails, you speak the Devil’s tongue. But mark, girl, it’s a seduction and before you blink twice it’s all you can speak, and so does a daywalker become a nightcomer.”

– The Nightcomers

The Verbis Diablo is a most dangerous tome/manuscript…

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Egyptologist Ferdinand Lyle tells Vanessa Ives, Dr. Victor Frankenstein, Sir Malcolm Murray, Ethan Chandler and Sembene the story of the verbis diablo…

No one tells a story like Ferdinand Lyle. He is a gifted storyteller and scholar.

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The creation of fictional languages {“colangs”} is a truly creative endeavour. I must admit that as a lover of language, I was deeply fascinated with colangs.

According to the Penny Dreadful’s internet movie database page:

“The language used in season two (Verbis Diabolo) is a fictional amalgam of Aramaic, Ancient Greek, Latin, and an obscure Arabic dialect called (in phonetic English) “Kan Allah Musali-Algins.

Verbis Diablo was created by David J. Peterson who is the co-founder and former president of the Language Creation Society which specializes in the creation of “constructed languages, or colangs”, from scratch. He’s also the creator of the languages used in Game of Thrones.”

-https://penny-dreadful.fandom.com/wiki/Verbis_Diablo_(language)

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“David J. Peterson: Verbis Diabolo is different from anything I’ve ever done. First, it’s a posteriori, which means that all the words and grammar come from other—in this case, real world—sources. Specifically, the sources were Arabic, Akkadian, Middle Egyptian, Attic Greek, Latin, Farsi and Turkish. Second, VD was not intended to be a language proper.

I looked at the language as an art piece. VD is supposed to be a language twisted in form; wrenched from Earth’s languages.Many words that meant something in a given language are taken and reversed phonetically to produce the equivalent VD word. Sometimes the reversal came with a reversal in meaning, as with justa, from Latin, which becomes atsüü, “vile”. Also pieces of words from many different languages will often be combined to produce portmanteaux which may have nothing to do with the original meanings of any of the parts.

In addition, though there are patterns in the language, sometimes the patterns are broken for no reason. A word which has meant the same thing every time one has heard it will suddenly have a new meaning in a new sentence for no discernible reason. Words will change orders to subvert previously attested patterns; words will be pronounced differently for no reason at all; the auxiliary, one of the few bits of predictability in the language, will move or drop out entirely.

All of this combines to produce something that doesn’t sound an awful lot like a language, and I think that’s true. It defies attempts to learn it, meaning that the only way to actually speak it is to be touched by the devil.In effect, that was the point.

So yeah, I had a lot of fun with it! It’s far different from anything I’ve ever done in the past. It sounds really weird. I’ve been pleased with the performances thus far.”

https://www.goodreads.com/author/508612.David_J_Peterson/questions

I am enamoured with the line that Ferdinand Lyle says at the beginning: “mischief is best enacted in small groups at very close quarters.”

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In this short clip, Ferdinand Lyle tells the story of the verbis diablo quite skillfully.

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Have you accepted Vanessa Ives’ invitation to enter the Penny Dreadful creative universe?

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Please enjoy Verbis Diablo from the Penny Dreadful soundtrack…

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Ferdinand Lyle’s story of the monk brother Gregory reminded me of the codex gigas myth.

In case you are interested in the codex gigas legend, I have included these videos.

The codex gigas is one book/tome that is not on my reading list.

{I also wonder how the codex gigas survived the Spanish inquisition?}.

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Further Research…

Rumihttps://www.rumi.net/

Penny Dreadful Television Serieshttps://www.imdb.com/title/tt2628232/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1

Verbis Diablo translations, text and audio… http://dedalvs.com/work/penny-dreadful/

David J. Peterson…https://artoflanguageinvention.com/

David J. Peterson’s Personal Website…http://dedalvs.com/

David J. Peterson’s The Art of Language Invention YouTube series…https://www.youtube.com/c/DavidPetersonAoLI

https://www.youtube.com/c/LangTimeStudio

The Art of Language Invention Book by David J. Peterson…http://www.penguin.com/book/the-art-of-language-invention-by-david-j-peterson/9780143126461

Language Creation Society…https://conlang.org/

Codex Gigashttps://www.ancient-origins.net/myths-legends-europe/codex-gigas-devils-bible-001276

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Have you watched Penny Dreadful?

What do you think about the Verbis Diablo?

What do you think about colangs?

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Many more Penny Dreadful reflections/posts to come…

Peace & Esoteric Love,

-V.

Reflection for today…Time To Live…-Jim Morrison

17 Apr

“Time to live, time to lie, time to laugh, and time to die.

Take it easy baby.

Take it as it comes.”

Jim Morrison

Jim Morrison Light

This Jim Morrison reflection embodies the carpe diem/seize the day spirit. He reminds us to be more fluid and take experiences in our lives as they come. He observes that we are living life too fast and we must live at a slower pace.

It reminds me of what is going on with the pandemic. This quarantine has forced us all to reflect, meditate on our lives and slow down. Life has a different taste when we are not rushing all of the time. 

Hopefully, when this is over, you can “specialize in having fun.”

It is time to live…

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Please enjoy Take It As It Comes by The Doors

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I want to include this intriguing performance of the Jim Morrison ballet.

I would have loved to see it.

The Leipzig Ballet performs Jim Morrison, a ballet by Mario Schröder about the life of the poet, singer‐songwriter, and legendary rock star, Jim Morrison, set to the music of the famous rock band “The Doors”, at the Oper Leipzig.”

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Take It As It Comes

The Doors

TAKE IT AS IT COMES LYRICS

[Chorus]
Takes it easy, baby
Take it as it comes
Don’t move too fast
And you want your love to last

Oh, you’ve been moving much too fast

[Verse 2]
Time to walk
Time to run
Time to aim your arrows
At the sun

[Chorus]
Takes it easy, baby
Take it as it comes
Don’t move too fast
And you want your love to last

Oh, you’ve been moving much too fast

[Verse 3]
Go real slow
You like it more and more
Take it as it comes
Specialize in having fun

[Chorus]
Takes it easy, baby
Take it as it comes
Don’t move too fast
And you want your love to last

Oh, you’ve been moving much too fast

[Outro]
Moving much too fast
Moving much too fast.”

Copied and Pasted from: https://genius.com/The-doors-take-it-as-it-comes-lyrics

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Research…

Jim Morrison…http://jimmorrison.com/

The Doors…https://thedoors.com/

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Peace & Carpe Diem…

-V.

Reflection for today…The Beauty of Living & Dying -Brandon Lee

1 Jan

Hello everyone. I thought I would start this year’s blog posts with a memento mori reflection on death and life. Since it is impossible to divorce death from life, we can use reflective energy to focus on how we want to live.

The beauty that Brandon Lee speaks with is eloquent, timeless and utterly peaceful. I am sure most of you know that Brandon was tragically killed while filming The Crow in 1993. This video clip was shot a little while before he died.

{I hope to do a post on The Crow and possibly Brandon Lee in the future}.

Let’s reflect on life and death with the same peace and gratitude that Brandon exudes.

Brandon Lee Reflective

Brandon Lee…A Beautiful Soul That Lived With Electric Vitality

I thank you so much for reading this humble blog.

I am eternally grateful.

Peace & Compassionate Love…

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GRtqMv_dubA

“Because we do not know when we will die,

we get to think of life as an inexhaustible well

and yet everything happens only a certain number of times and a very small number, really.

How many more times will you remember a certain afternoon of your childhood?

An afternoon that is so deeply a part of your being that you can’t even conceive of your life without it. Perhaps four, five times more. Perhaps not even that.

How many more times will you watch the full moon rise?

Perhaps twenty and yet it all seems limitless.”

-From the book The Sheltering Sky by Paul Bowles

This quote is on Brandon’s Tombstone.
Brandon is buried next to his father Bruce Lee in the Lake View Cemetary in Seattle, Washington.

Here is a closer look…

Brandon loved this quote so much that he had chosen it for his wedding invitations.

He was to be married to his soul mate Eliza Hutton one week after he finished filming The Crow on April 17th, 1993. Brandon tragically died on March 31st, 1993.

The Crow is dedicated to Brandon and Eliza.

Brandon & Eliza…Soul Mates Never Die…

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Please enjoy Street Spirit by Radiohead…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nPX3u0XJzKM

radiohead – street spirit (fade out)

  

Street Spirit (Fade Out)

“Rows of houses all bearing down on me I can feel their blue hands touching me All these things into position All these things we’ll one day swallow whole And fade out again and fade out

This machine will not communicate These thoughts and the strain I am under Be a world child, form a circle Before we all go under And fade out again and fade out again

Cracked eggs, dead birds Scream as they fight for life I can feel death, can see it’s beady eyes All these things into position All these things we’ll one day swallow whole And fade out again and fade out again

Immerse your soul in love Immerse your soul in love.”

SONG INFORMATION

Released: March 1995 Found on: The Bends & Street Spirit single. Acoustic version found on Fake Plastic Trees CD2.

This song was written in 1993, around the same time as “My Iron Lung.” “Creep” is Radiohead’s American hit, this is the British equivalent. Noted by singer-songwriter and guitarist Thom Yorke as “one of [the band’s] saddest songs” and describing it as “the dark tunnel without the light at the end,” “Street Spirit” was released as the band’s ninth single and reached number five on the UK Singles Chart, the highest chart position the band achieved until “Paranoid Android” from OK Computer, which reached number three in 1997.

Yorke has suggested that the song was inspired by the 1991 novel The Famished Road, written by Ben Okri, and that its music was inspired by R.E.M. The track is built around a soft melody in A minor with an arpeggio (broken chord) guitar part.

Thom: “Street Spirit is our purest song, but I didn’t write it. It wrote itself. We were just its messengers; its biological catalysts. Its core is a complete mystery to me, and, you know, I wouldn’t ever try to write something that hopeless. All of our saddest songs have somewhere in them at least a glimmer of resolve. Street Spirit has no resolve. It is the dark tunnel without the light at the end. It represents all tragic emotion that is so hurtful that the sound of that melody is its only definition. We all have a way of dealing with that song. It’s called detachment. Especially me; I detach my emotional radar from that song, or I couldn’t play it. I’d crack. I’d break down on stage. That’s why its lyrics are just a bunch of mini-stories or visual images as opposed to a cohesive explanation of its meaning. I used images set to the music that I thought would convey the emotional entirety of the lyric and music working together. That’s what’s meant by ‘all these things you’ll one day swallow whole’. I meant the emotional entirety, because I didn’t have it in me to articulate the emotion. I’d crack…

Our fans are braver than I to let that song penetrate them, or maybe they don’t realise what they’re listening to. They don’t realise that Street Spirit is about staring the fucking devil right in the eyes, and knowing, no matter what the hell you do, he’ll get the last laugh. And it’s real, and true. The devil really will get the last laugh in all cases without exception, and if I let myself think about that too long, I’d crack.

I can’t believe we have fans that can deal emotionally with that song. That’s why I’m convinced that they don’t know what it’s about. It’s why we play it towards the end of our sets. It drains me, and it shakes me, and hurts like hell every time I play it, looking out at thousands of people cheering and smiling, oblivious to the tragedy of its meaning, like when you’re going to have your dog put down and it’s wagging its tail on the way there. That’s what they all look like, and it breaks my heart. I wish that song hadn’t picked us as its catalysts, and so I don’t claim it. It asks too much. I didn’t write that song.”

-Copied & Pasted from http://www.greenplastic.com/radiohead-lyrics/the-bends/street-spirit-fade-out/

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For more information…

Brandon Lee…http://www.brandonleemovement.com/

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000488/

The Sheltering Sky book by Paul Bowles…

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/243598.The_Sheltering_Sky 

The Crow Film…http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0109506/?ref_=nv_sr_1 

The Crow Graphic Novel…http://thecrowcomics.wordpress.com/

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/97486.The_Crow

James O’Barr {The Crow Creator}…http://jamesobarr.typepad.com/ 

Radiohead…http://www.radiohead.com/

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What do you think about Brandon’s favourite quote?

What are your reflections?

I would love to read them.

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Brandon Wishes You An Open Mind & An Open Heart…

Peace & Namaste…

Japan’s Suicide Forest Teaches About Compassion & The Human Need For Real Connection…

18 Sep

Suicide is a very uncomfortable and necessary subject to discuss.

I recently came across a YouTube video that left such an impact on me that I was not able to write a blog post until now {approx. 18 days}.

The vice documentary left such a deep impression on me that I had to reflect for a while before I could decide what to write.

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Japan’s Aokigahara (青木ヶ原) forest also known as the Sea of Trees (樹海 Jukai) or the Suicide forest is a place where many people go to contemplate suicide.

Sadly, many actually commit suicide.

I feel so much compassion for people who are considering suicide as a way to end their pain.

I strongly believe that people do not actually want to die but to end their pain and they do not see another way to achieve this.

Below is an actual suicide note found in the forest.

I find it heart breaking.

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Many moons ago, I had a friend that was considering suicide.

I pray that he finds the strength to fight against his darkness.

I am still haunted by the fact that he felt this depressed but I could not do anything to heal his pain.

I know that only he can heal his pain.

I did my best to be a loving friend but I know that we cannot truly save anyone.

We can only save ourselves. 

In fact, we always had a friendly argument about saving and being saved.

It revolved around the graphic novel and film Sin City.

Here is the trailer in case you are interested

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YKFLrTYKIXk

Please click this link for more information on the movie: Sin City.

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Marv was so madly in love with Goldie and he loved her so much that he wanted to go to hell to save her.

My friend fiercely defended his thesis of loving someone so deeply that you go to hell to save them.

Art Made By Nat Wellington at http://boodoyouthinkyouare.blogspot.ca/

Conversely, I went for a different thesis. I said that you can love someone so much that you get out of hell because of your love for them and possibly their love for you. Your love for them is so powerful and/or their love for you is so strong that you pull yourself up with your own strength and get out of hell- your personal hell or the other kind. In essence, you save yourself instead of saving someone else.

No one was right or wrong. It was fun to discuss but I stand by my point of view even though I recognize his had merit. It all depends on how you look at things. It was a healthy discussion nonetheless.

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Can we actually save someone?

Dita Von Teese & Marilyn Manson in Vogue Magazine

Dita Von Teese & Marilyn Manson in Vogue Magazine Photo By Steven Klein

 Azusa Hayano makes me question my beliefs that we cannot save anyone but ourselves.

I do believe we can help someone to save themselves and this is what I think he does so brilliantly and compassionately.

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We meet an extraordinary soul, Azusa Hayano, in this vice documentary.

He is a geologist that does the most important job of suicide patrol in the forest. {I discovered from another video that the police also seem to do suicide patrol}.

Azusa also studies how people co-exist with nature because he says it is part of environmental research.

He still does not know why people kill themselves in such a beautiful forest (18:53) although he does explain that it may be because of a popular book written in the past.

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Azusa patrols the forest looking for people who are contemplating suicide in hopes of convincing them otherwise.

He even finds a man in a yellow tent that appears to have been contemplating suicide. According to the VICE website comments found at http://www.vice.com/vice-news/aokigahara-suicide-forest-v3, the man in the yellow tent had been camping in the forest for one month. He had to be taken out in an ambulance.

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The police even put up signs to try to stop people from committing suicide. They also provide the number for suicide hotlines.

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I found it fascinating that many people leave a trail of tape to find their way back in case they change their mind. This is hopeful because people who are undecided can finally decide to leave the forest.

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With his gentle and compassionate manner, one can see how Azusa could convince someone who is struggling to live.

I was struck by how much this man cares.

He really cares and that is so rare these days.

In a forest where traditional compasses do not work, Azusa uses his compassion and wisdom as his guides.

He also looks for people who have committed suicide.

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Azusa reminds me of the value of a life and how much difference one life can make in the world.

If we could find our purpose and live our potential, then we could make our contribution- our gift to the world.

We need more people like Azusa in this world.

We need more people who really care and have compassion for those who are suffering. I don’t know if he technically “saves” anyone but he does help people to save themselves and this is priceless.

Azusa is actually living the Buddha’s teachings- especially that of compassion.

I am also reminded by how the absence of one life can be a tear in the fabric of existence and humanity. I think about how that person had so much more life to live, love and wisdom to give and receive, experiences to be had and potential to be lived.

I think of the apocalyptic loss for their loved ones.

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Azusa states in the documentary that the internet and technology may be the reason why there is such a disconnection between oneself and others. It is as if a schism is caused between our waking lives and our onscreen lives. Our lack of face-to-face communication has a price. Disconnection, depression, further loneliness and numbness may develop. Azusa discusses the human need for connection in real life- not through the filter of a computer screen.

“Face-to-face communication used to be vital, but now we can live our lives being online all day. However, the truth of the matter is that we still need to see each other’s faces, read their expressions, hear their voices, so we can fully understand their emotions to coexist.”
 -Azusa Hayano

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The essence of what Azusa teaches and lives is filled with compassion and wisdom.

This documentary also reminds me of the urgent need to discuss mental health issues.

I am and continue to be a mental health advocate.

I deeply believe in the strength and resilience of the human spirit.

We can transcend our suffering and transform it into something beautiful and meaningful.

The phoenix always rises from the ashes… 

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To those of you suffering and feeling depressed…I offer you my compassion.

This post is for you.

Please speak to someone who cares- even if they are a stranger.

You will never know what a difference it could make in your life. They might have some life changing wisdom to give you or messages from the universe.

*Please reach out to someone.

I pray that the Buddha’s teachings, wisdom and compassion can alleviate your suffering. 

Conversely, you never know how you can help someone who is suffering and in need.

You never know what impact you can have on someone’s life- even a stranger.

We are all interconnected.

By helping others we are actually helping ourselves.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SuUhBuSgmik

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Here is the documentary friends.

Please be warned of the graphic subject matter of this video and of some sad and possibly disturbing video footage…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4FDSdg09df8 

Here is part of the transcript:

Aokigahara: Suicide Forest

I’ve been living here for more than 30 years. My job is mainly environmental protection, I study volcanic eruptions and the plantation at the foot of Mt. Fuji. 

In the year 864, Mt. Fuji erupted, and the forest that grew over the dried lava was named “Jukai” or “Sea of Trees”. Aokigahara is the actual name of the place, but people started calling it “Jukai”, because the forest as seen from halfway up of Mt. Fuji, is green all year round, and it looks like the ocean. 

We’re entering the forest now. There’s a car that’s been abandoned for a few months, let’s take a look. I’m assuming the owner of the car went in from here and never came out. I guess they went into the forest with troubled thoughts. 

In the old days in Japan, suicide was mainly known as the samarai’s act, as in “Seppuku” (harakari). In other cases poor families would abandon their elders in the mountains. That’s how it was back then, they weren’t killing themselves cause they couldn’t adapt to society. That didn’t happen like it does now, it’s a modern phenomenon.

This is a sign to stop suicidal people.

“Your life is a precious gift from your parents,
Please think about your parents, siblings, and children.
Don’t keep it to yourself. Talk about your troubles.”

Then it says to contact the Suicide Prevention Association. 

Locals don’t commt suicide here. As children they’re told not to come near here, that it’s a scary forest. This path is open for the public, but you can’t follow the trail beyond this point. It says not to enter because you can easily get lost. In the Jukai, I think I’ve found more than… 100 suicide corpses in the last 20 years or so. 

I found something strange, I’ll show you. People who are indecisive about dying, wrap this tape on trees along their way, so they can find their way out. There’s something that looks like a tent. I’m going to see if anyone’s inside, please wait here.” -Azusa Hayano, geologist

The forest is a popular place for suicides, reportedly the world’s second most popular suicide location after San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge. This popularity is often attributed to the 1960 novel Nami no To  by Seicho Matsumoto, which ends with two lovers committing suicide in the forest. However, the history of suicide in Aokigahara dates from before the novel’s publication, and the place has long been associated with death: ubasute was allegedly practiced there into the 19th century, and the forest is reputedly haunted by the ghosts of those left to die…”

Copied and pasted from: http://ponury.tumblr.com/post/15293840018/aokigahara-suicide-forest-ive-been-living-here

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Here is a short video about the Aokigahara forest and the plague of suicide in Japan (2:34). There is thought to be one suicide every fifteen minutes in Japan.

An expert postulates that societal pressures and culture is to blame for the high suicide rate in Japan (1:55). He notes that even from a young age weakness is not allowed to be displayed.

“Whether it is within the family, at work or in society, it is very hard to show weakness. From a very young age, from primary school on, dynamic and happy kids are held up as examples to follow. If you don’t live up to that, other people treat you harshly and that’s is why people don’t ask for help.”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mq1-0FvME8U&feature=player_embedded

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This video offers a different perspective of the Aokiagahara forest (4:57).

It attempts to answer the question of why people come to die there.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PD2cJlx-caQ&feature=player_embedded#!

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It is intriguing to note that Dante wrote about a suicide forest.

His writing was also translated into art.

Dante Alighieri’s Inferno from the Original by Dante Alighieri and Illustrated with the Designs of Gustave Doré (New York: Cassell Publishing Company, 1890).

Dante Alighieri’s Inferno from the Original by Dante Alighieri and Illustrated with the Designs of Gustave Doré (New York: Cassell Publishing Company, 1890).

Dali’s depiction of the ‘Wood of Suicides’ from ‘Inferno’ 13
©2006 Salvador Dalí, Gala–Salvador Dali Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

I would love to hear your thoughts about this post.

Peace & Namaste…